Modern Era

Since 1913 the Royal Horticultural Society's Chelsea Flower Show has been held annually on the South Grounds.

The Chelsea Pensioner accommodation - or 'berths' - were enlarged in 1954-55 and again in 1991 to resize them from 6' by 6' to 9' by 9'.

2002 saw the restoration of the large mural painting in the Great Hall by the artists Antonio Verrio and Henry Cooke.

Margaret Thatcher Infirmary at the Royal Hospital Chelsea

As part of the celebrations for Queen Elizabeth II's Golden Jubilee in 2002, the statue of King Charles II was regilded. The Royal Hospital Chelsea presented the Queen with the parade chair (which can be seen in the Museum) and Queen Elizabeth II presented the Royal Hospital with the Sovereign Mace, which is now carried at all of the Royal Hospital's ceremonial events.

In March 2009 the Margaret Thatcher Infirmary (pictured), designed by Sir Quinlan Terry, was opened and is a state of the art care home and hospice for Chelsea Pensioners.

As of October 2015 all Chelsea Pensioner berths have been upgraded to meet the needs of the 21st century veteran, with all berths designed with a study area and en suite bathroom facilities. Read more about this upgrade work here or watch the video below.

 

Royal Hospital Chelsea Newsletter

Stay up to date with what's going on at The Royal Hospital by signing up for our e‑newsletter.

News

View the archive

HRH, The Prince Philip - Duke of Edinburgh Painting
Chelsea Pensioners share recollections of HRH The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh

The Royal Hospital Chelsea community continues to send our thoughts and condolences to the Royal Family at this difficult time. Many of our Chelsea Pensioners were fortunate enough to meet HRH The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh at the Royal Hospital’s Founder’s Day celebrations or through his other official duties.

Infirmary Bombing
Remembering the Soane Infirmary bombing

Today marks 80 years following the bombing of the Royal Hospital’s Infirmary during the Second World War. The magnificent Infirmary, which once stood on the current site of the National Army Museum, was hit by a parachute bomb on 16 April 1941 – destroying most of the building and tragically ending the lives of 13 people.

Twitter

Follow @RHChelsea